Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Arizona. Grand Canyon State



Journeyed over to Arizona this Thanksgiving weekend. While every single tourist seemed headed to the Grand Canyon, I chose to stay in the heart of red rock country aka Sedona. A quiet little town snuggled among red towers of sandstone. Cathedral rock, Coffee pot, Bell & Snoopy to name a few. The town reminded me of Santa Fe in some ways. Places like this always attract the painters, the sculptors, the photographers and at times characters like me.

Sedona is rich in history too. There are several Native American historical sites close to Sedona. (Another reason why I chose Sedona) Native American culture and history is something close to my heart. The Sinagua lived here from about 500 AD to around 1400 AD. Sinagua is a Spanish word meaning without water. People without water. Sedona like vast portions of Arizona is very dry. The climate is harsh and water scarce. Archaeological findings indicate that the Sinagua were a very resourceful people. They truly understood the land. Trees, shrubs, grass and cactus which looked dry and insignificant to me, were deeply valuable to the Sinagua. They all had a purpose. For example, the commonly found Yucca plant was used as food, as medicine, as fiber and various other things!

The Tuzigoot National Monument, the Wupatki National Monument and the Montezuma Castle National Monument all provide a glimpse into what was a rich culture. Around 1400 AD, these settlements were mysteriously abandoned. Archaeologists have no clue why!. The Hopi however believe the Sinagua migrated to the north and joined them.




While in Arizona, the Grand Canyon is a "Did you not go there? What is wrong with you ?" must visit.

If you are looking to absorb the grand view, a holiday weekend is probably not the best of time. People from all over the world busy clicking, smiling, giggling, yaking, profounding and busy posing. People eagerly waiting for other people to get off that perfect Kodak point.

This was my first visit to the Canyon. Even though I wished all the tourists would vanish, it was a great experience nevertheless. Some day I would like to hike all the way to the bottom. Soak up the whole place all to myself.

All in all, a nice trip. Expanded my collection of Native American pottery. And the pictures came out well exposed. Am beginning to get a better handle on exposure and color finally. Happy!

I have a few more pictures here

Quote of the day
"You know you're from Arizona when you feed your chickens ice cubes to keep them from laying hard-boiled eggs."~Local Saying (via Quote Garden)

18 comments:

Kris said...

Amazing snaps...mindblowing lanscapes

Jennifer said...

I absolutely LOVE Arizona. I have been trying to get my husband to move there for the past two years, but he refuses. We’ve stayed in Sedona, too. The last time was in the middle of a major drought (2002, I think?). There were signs up everywhere saying “Please Pray for Rain”. Sliderock was shut down, as were several hiking trails at the Canyon. I have a photo of Montezuma’s Castle that is identical to yours! As a student of archaeology, and lover of all things Native American, I feel totally at peace and centered in that part of our country. Can’t wait to go back!

Bidi-K said...

Such beautiful photographs! Lovely... you should also try visiting Bryce in Utah. I loved the rock formations - the "hoodoos" as they call it :)

Bidisha

Chris said...

Yes, the photography class is paying off, my friend! Beautiful photos!

One More Reason said...

Kris, Thanks

Jennifer, It is indeed a peaceful place.Hope you get to go back soon.

Kaushik & Bidisha, Thanks. Bryce is on my list. I might go there this Christmas (maybe) :)

Chris, Thanks. I am glad I took that class.

Thanu said...

Great pictures. I loved the last one on this blog.

Ganja Turtle said...

Am not an expert photgrapher...but liked in particular some of your photgraphs - household icon esp.

Like somebody else says, maybe u shud write a post on "how to become the new adler-using the latest canon a75?"

One More Reason said...

Thanu , Thanks.

ganja turtle, Thanks for taking the time and visiting my photo blog. Am glad you liked some of the snaps. I am still learning the basics of photography. I can try and compile some tips. Not sure if it will be any thing new :)

Jithu said...

woowww!!!! this is stunning man!!!!! its one of my dreamz to visit the grand canyon.. donno when i'm gonna do it :-(

Keasty said...

Looks like we'll have to add this area to our list when we come visit in 2006. Thanks.

One More Reason said...

Jithu , Thanks. Hope you make it there.

Keasty, It is indeed a great place to visit

silverine said...

Wow!!! the pictures are awesome!!!

Old Path said...

Excellent post! The Grand Canyon picture is beautiful. If you could adjust the curve in PS I believe the colours would become more vibrant.

Jennifer said...

I keep coming back here just to gawk at the photos. while I sit wrapped in my electric blanket drinking hot cocoa. sigh.

One More Reason said...

Silverine, Thanks. Glad you like them

Madhu, Thanks and Thanks for the idea. I will give it a try.

Jennifer, Funny I was just thinking of making a cup of hot cocoa myself

Sunil said...

Excellent....

I greatly enjoyed my time exploring this same region last year (in december). We spent well over a week there....and spent time in Tuzicoot, Montezuma, Jerome, Sedona, Wupatki, and finally the Grand Canyon. Absolutely fascinating trip.

What's interesting to me is that the Anasazi people disappeared, and the subsequent native civilizations (Hopi, Navajo etc) seem to have lost much of what the "old people" had.

Where did it go? Was there a break between the civilizations?

Samit said...

Great pictures...

Mridula said...

Loved your write up and the pictures. Have you seen this travel site? You might like it:

http://www.gonomad.com/